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Six Types of People You Meet in Church Planting

by Todd Bumgarner, Lead Pastor at 2 Pillars Church in Lincoln, NE As a church planter, you are called to raise up disciples and leaders. It's an investment of time and energy that is critical to the mission of your church. One of the hardest truths early on in church planting is discerning who is with you and who is not. As I have worked with people, I’ve learned there are six categories into which someone falls. Categorizing people is helpful to determine where to focus your time and energy and to wake you up to the reality that some people, despite their excitement and interest, simply are not on board. 1. Family These are the folks who are all-in. They’ve caught the vision and want to help in any way possible. They are servant-leaders and their commitment is ...

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Lives Changed in Boston

Lives Changed in Boston! When Matt told this story, I wanted to share it with you because these stories represent something much greater than us  — lives changed by the power of Holy Spirit and the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ. And at the end of the day, that's what we're all about: planting churches that plant missional, Spirit-led, gospel-centered churches, so that more people might see and hear the Good News of Jesus. Below is a story about a new church's baptism service, as told by the lead pastor and Acts 29 member, Matt Chewning. — Scott Thomas by Matt Chewning Recently at Netcast Church in Boston, MA, we celebrated being 9 months old and we did it by seeing 6 people come to faith in Jesus and baptizing 7 people in front of an attendance of ...

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Leadership Requires Strength by Grace

by Scott Thomas, President of Acts 29 Spiritual and church leadership is tough for even the best of leaders. Behind closed doors, every leader will admit being tired, frustrated, angry, depressed, confused and attacked. The Apostle Paul's protégé, Timothy was about to take up his work he needed to be a leader filled with grace. Paul told Timothy, "You therefore, my son, be strengthened by the grace that is in Christ Jesus" (2 Timothy 2:2). We are only able to lead effectively after grace strengthens us. "We are only able to lead effectivelyafter grace strengthens us." Be strengthened by grace, not by your natural talents. Timothy may have certainly been very winsome naturally. He may have been able to articulate naturally. He may have been a fairly good public speaker. ...

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Brothers on Mission Together

by Scott Thomas, President of Acts 29 In Christ, we have a familial identity. We are not fatherless children hopelessly in search for our identity in our accomplishments. We have been adopted into a missionary family. We serve a missionary God. Mission becomes part of our identity because our Father is a missionary God and we resemble him as a child of God. The Church is a missionary family, with missionary focus, that does missionary things for the glory of a missionary Father. It is who we are and it is also what we do. Mission is not something we tack on to the list of activities as a Christian. It is both what we are commissioned to do and who we are adopted to be. Jesus came and said to them, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Go therefore ...

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Leadership is Shaking a Hand Too Exuberantly

By Scott Thomas, President of Acts 29 Network Jim Harbaugh, the first year coach of the San Francisco 49'ers created some controversy when his team beat the previously unbeaten Detroit Lions and excitedly shook the hand of the opposing coach, Jim Schwartz "too hard." Schwartz ran after him offended at Harbaugh. The story is already old and can be seen on YouTube. Even though his handshake was not within the "guidelines of NFL protocol," I liked that Harbaugh, a proven winning coach, was excited about the outcome of his team. Many leaders fail to passionately celebrate the accomplished goals of their team or business or church. It seems that they are never satisfied and are focused on the minor flaws rather than exuberantly enjoying the positive advances with the team. Too many leaders ...

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